Market pictures – Web A Photo http://web-a-photo.com/ Sun, 19 Sep 2021 07:42:05 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://web-a-photo.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-23T173451.957.png Market pictures – Web A Photo http://web-a-photo.com/ 32 32 Photos: Inside the stunning Herefordshire farmhouse on the market for £ 1.4million https://web-a-photo.com/photos-inside-the-stunning-herefordshire-farmhouse-on-the-market-for-1-4million/ Sun, 19 Sep 2021 06:00:21 +0000 https://web-a-photo.com/photos-inside-the-stunning-herefordshire-farmhouse-on-the-market-for-1-4million/ A magnificent grade II listed farmhouse with outbuildings and land is for sale in Herefordshire. Two Parks Farm, near Upton Bishop, is on the market with Agents Savills with a guide price of £ 1,395,000. Savills said the property includes a beautifully renovated and fascinating farmhouse and a selection of useful outbuildings, complemented by an […]]]>

A magnificent grade II listed farmhouse with outbuildings and land is for sale in Herefordshire.

Two Parks Farm, near Upton Bishop, is on the market with Agents Savills with a guide price of £ 1,395,000.

Savills said the property includes a beautifully renovated and fascinating farmhouse and a selection of useful outbuildings, complemented by an open pasture of around 24 acres.

The property also has a large detached brick barn with current planning permission for a single private dwelling.

The farmhouse is Grade II listed and consists of an original two-story half-timbered section that adjoins a beautiful three-story local stone section, creating a spacious main house with a flexible layout.

Image: Zoopla / Savills

On the ground floor is a good sized reception hall, featuring a corner fireplace with log burner, tiled floors and a picture window with window seat, a lounge with a second corner fireplace and a view of the gardens, and a good size kitchen with many custom cabinets, central island, Aga stove and integrated appliances including dishwasher and microwave.

Hereford Times: Photo: Zoopla / SavillsImage: Zoopla / Savills

There is also a utility room with integrated washing machine and cloakroom beyond while the dining room is accessed from the kitchen and has tile flooring, a large fireplace with wood burner with old bread oven and exterior door.

An exceptional garden room is located in the hallway and adjacent to the kitchen, providing excellent entertainment space and stunning views over the gardens and farmland.

Hereford Times: Photo: Zoopla / SavillsImage: Zoopla / Savills

Upstairs, three bedrooms and two bathrooms as well as an office area.

On the second floor are two further bedrooms. All bedrooms benefit from exposed beams and lovely views over the surrounding land.

Outside is a good sized brick open fronted cattle shed with a dedicated pen and two driveway access points.

Hereford Times: Photo: Zoopla / SavillsImage: Zoopla / Savills

A large detached stone barn with slate roof is located at the edge of the B4221 and has a building permit to convert it into residential accommodation.

There is also a useful range of cattle pens and stable buildings, lovely gardens with a wildlife pond and duck island, and good expanses of lawns. An impressive garage block for up to four vehicles with workshop is accessible via a pretty courtyard near the farm.

Pens with post and rail fences enclose buildings and provide excellent land for cattle or horseback riding.

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Cancer Diagnosis Leads to Marketing of Markle’s Icon “The Pickle” https://web-a-photo.com/cancer-diagnosis-leads-to-marketing-of-markles-icon-the-pickle/ Sat, 18 Sep 2021 00:30:56 +0000 https://web-a-photo.com/cancer-diagnosis-leads-to-marketing-of-markles-icon-the-pickle/ MARKLE, Ind. (WANE) – To the people of the small town of Markle, the Pickle is a big dill. The bar and restaurant have been around since the early 90s and are now for sale. “The Pickle was a blessing,” Jon Goetz said. “It’s a happy place, it’s a happy place to train. His reputation […]]]>

MARKLE, Ind. (WANE) – To the people of the small town of Markle, the Pickle is a big dill. The bar and restaurant have been around since the early 90s and are now for sale.

“The Pickle was a blessing,” Jon Goetz said. “It’s a happy place, it’s a happy place to train. His reputation took off.

After quitting their corporate jobs, husband and wife Jon and Tracy Goetz purchased The Pickle on October 31, 2005. The following January, they held their grand opening.

“It was ridiculous,” Jon Goetz said. “There were only standing places. You couldn’t access the back of the restaurant.

Tracy and Jon Goetz

“It was amazing,” said Tracy Goetz. “And we had a band that night and Chuck Surack was playing saxophone and walking across the bar.”

Over the past 16 years, their success has continued. They say the bar has been a blessing, in part thanks to the support of the community and their wonderful employees. Especially when COVID-19 has struck.

“The Pickle is only successful because Markle has accepted and supported us so much,” said Jon Goetz.

“I hope we will give the community what they give us,” said Tracy Goetz.

The bar and restaurant offers a variety of homemade dishes including burgers, pizza, baked subs and steaks, while also serving alcoholic drinks. On a typical Saturday night, a table can be hard to find, but a warm welcome is not.

“The Pickle is your essential small town bar,” said Tracy Goetz. “The atmosphere is like cheering. You come in and everyone knows you and if they don’t and you come twice, they usually will.

The couple say the goal was to own and work together for 20 years, but life had other plans.

Last year, Tracy Goetz was diagnosed with stage 3 malignant melanoma. Since then, she has undergone 11 chemotherapy treatments and has had numerous surgeries. Recently she learned that she will no longer be able to work due to nerve damage.

Jon continued to work but the couple say they missed working together.

“It’s like peanut butter and jelly,” said Tracy Goetz. “You take one out and it’s not the same.”

After much deliberation, the couple put The Pickle up for sale on Tuesday.

The building, located at 102 E Morse Street in downtown Markle, is on the market for $ 680,000. Included in the sale are all furniture, equipment, licenses and the bar’s secret honey and jalapeño vinaigrette.

Upstairs, a T2, an old reception hall and a large storage room in the basement.

Photos of the facility are provided below courtesy of Nick Huffman of Steffen Group. To learn more about the sale of the building click here.

Jon and Tracy say they hope the community welcomes the new owners.

“We hope the new owners will do as well as us and I think they will do as well as us,” said Jon Goetz. “We have the best staff. The new owner has a great advantage with them.

“They’ve been with us through COVID, my trip and they also come with the sale and they never complained,” Tracy Goetz said. “We wish the new

The Pickle will remain open during the sale. The Goets say they plan to stay in the community.

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A night out at Newcastle’s Popworld in 2010 – 10 pics of guys and girls on the Toon https://web-a-photo.com/a-night-out-at-newcastles-popworld-in-2010-10-pics-of-guys-and-girls-on-the-toon/ Fri, 17 Sep 2021 10:33:16 +0000 https://web-a-photo.com/a-night-out-at-newcastles-popworld-in-2010-10-pics-of-guys-and-girls-on-the-toon/ The ladies and gentlemen in our 10 photographs were having fun at the Popworld late night bar in Newcastle’s Bigg Market in 2010 It was 2010 and the guys and girls in our 10 photographs were enjoying a night out in Newcastle city center. Our photos capture scenes from one of Bigg Market’s favorite bars, […]]]>

The ladies and gentlemen in our 10 photographs were having fun at the Popworld late night bar in Newcastle’s Bigg Market in 2010

It was 2010 and the guys and girls in our 10 photographs were enjoying a night out in Newcastle city center.

Our photos capture scenes from one of Bigg Market’s favorite bars, Popworld – formerly Half Moon.

Popworld describes itself as “a late night bar with a difference – we are cheese with style! You will be greeted by our friendly bar staff and party the night away with fun loving people”.

READ MORE: The Gateshead Millennium Bridge in pictures – every year from 2001 to 2021

Paul Costello was Popworld’s resident DJ between 2007 and 2010.

He said, “I took pictures of groups of people and played them on the TV screens inside the room.”

Paul has kindly shared with us a selection of his photographs and we have published some of them over the past few weeks and months.

You can find out more about what’s going on at Popworld on their Facebook page.

Our 10 photos were all taken at Popworld in 2010. We hope the past 11 years have been nice to the boys and girls in the photos.

Thanks to ‘Popworld Paul’.

For more Chronicle nostalgia, including archival footage and local history stories, click here to sign up for our free newsletter.

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Fox News vaccine review draws attention to its own strict policies https://web-a-photo.com/fox-news-vaccine-review-draws-attention-to-its-own-strict-policies/ Fri, 17 Sep 2021 00:48:00 +0000 https://web-a-photo.com/fox-news-vaccine-review-draws-attention-to-its-own-strict-policies/ NEW YORK – Constant criticism of COVID vaccine mandates by numbers on Fox News has drawn attention to his own company’s strict rules on the subject – even from President Joe Biden. The president was denounced as “authoritarian” and “chief divider” on Fox last week after announcing new efforts to force more Americans to get […]]]>

NEW YORK – Constant criticism of COVID vaccine mandates by numbers on Fox News has drawn attention to his own company’s strict rules on the subject – even from President Joe Biden.

The president was denounced as “authoritarian” and “chief divider” on Fox last week after announcing new efforts to force more Americans to get vaccinated.

When Biden laid out a plan requiring companies with 100 or more employees to ensure their employees are fully immunized or test negative for COVID at least once a week, he noted that “some of the larger companies require it. already – United Airlines, Disney, Tyson Foods and even Fox News.

Still, Kevin Lord, executive vice president of human resources at Fox News parent company, Fox Corp. FOX,
said in a note this week that the company will require all unvaccinated employees to be tested every day – not just once a week – in order to work at company facilities. The policy was first reported by CNN.

Fox last month demanded that employees report proof of their status, and Lord said more than 90% of full-time employees had been fully immunized.

Fox’s most popular prime-time host, Tucker Carlson, devoted nearly the first 20 minutes of his show Wednesday to Biden’s COVID efforts, saying the rules require people to submit to bullying.

“You can’t allow people to force you to take drugs that you don’t want or need,” Carlson said. “It’s up to you which medications you take, period. If you allow people to force you into drugs you don’t want, it’s over. They own you. You are no longer free, period.

He interviewed comedian Jim Breuer, who said he is canceling shows at venues that require members of the public to be vaccinated. Carlson said Breuer “spoke like an American. Where are the other American men?

In another interview with Carlson, former CBS News reporter Lara Logan compared Biden’s plans to Marxism and Nazism.

“It’s all about control,” she said.

The chyrons on the screen read “No surprise: Biden’s rules are inconsistent” and “Fauci wants to ban human interaction.”

Fox was attacked from the right by a former employee, Eric Bolling. Now on the conservative Newsmax network, Bolling said Wednesday evening that the network’s leaders were pushing the wrong policies.

“So while Fox hosts lament and complain about liberals forcing Americans to get vaccinated, they themselves are doing the same – and that’s the classic definition of hypocrisy,” he said. he declares.

Bolling said he had vaccinated himself, “by choice,” and said Newsmax encouraged its employees to be vaccinated but did not require it. Bolling was ousted from Fox News in 2017 following reports he sent unwanted obscene images to women who worked with him on the network.

A Fox spokesperson declined to comment on Bolling or other critics about a mismatch between company policy and the views expressed by its staff. To be clear, too, while it will require daily COVID testing for the unvaccinated, Fox does not require shots.

No Fox on-air personality has addressed the company’s COVID policies.

CNN is demanding that its employees who work in the office or in the field with co-workers be vaccinated, and last month sacked three people for breaking that rule.

A note sent by Fox News Media CEO Suzanne Scott last month highlighted Fox’s requirement that employees report their vaccination status. Scott then said masks were optional for people who had been fully vaccinated, but were strongly encouraged in public buildings and required in small places, like broadcast control rooms.

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Monthly ABS employment figures show lockdowns cut hours worked, unemployed drop out https://web-a-photo.com/monthly-abs-employment-figures-show-lockdowns-cut-hours-worked-unemployed-drop-out/ Thu, 16 Sep 2021 02:59:36 +0000 https://web-a-photo.com/monthly-abs-employment-figures-show-lockdowns-cut-hours-worked-unemployed-drop-out/ There is new evidence that the unemployed are giving up on looking for work in Australia, while lockdowns have reduced hours worked. Australia’s unemployment rate fell again last month, reflecting a drop in the participation rate largely due to the protracted lockdown in New South Wales, rather than a strengthening workforce. The unemployment rate fell […]]]>

There is new evidence that the unemployed are giving up on looking for work in Australia, while lockdowns have reduced hours worked.

Australia’s unemployment rate fell again last month, reflecting a drop in the participation rate largely due to the protracted lockdown in New South Wales, rather than a strengthening workforce.

The unemployment rate fell to 4.5 percent in August from 4.6 percent the month before, while the participation rate weakened 0.8 percentage points to 65.2 percent.

It follows a 0.2 percentage point drop in the participation rate in July and shows that many Australians are dropping out of the workforce.

CommSec chief economist Craig James said those who were not actively looking for work, but technically classified as neither employed nor unemployed, “were effectively in hibernation.”

For those who were employed, hours fell 3.7 percent in August, far more than the 1.1 percent drop in employment.

The figure highlighted the extent to which people who experienced new or continued lockdowns reduced their hours or no work without necessarily losing their jobs, the Australian Bureau of Statistics said on Thursday.

ABS head of labor statistics Bjorn Jarvis said the relatively large drop in unemployment accounted for about 13% of the 168,000 drop in the total labor force.

“The drop in the unemployment rate reflects a sharp drop in participation during the recent lockdowns rather than strengthening labor market conditions,” Jarvis said.

“Throughout the pandemic, we have seen a sharp drop in attendance during lockdowns – a pattern repeated in recent months.

“Beyond people who lose their jobs, we have seen unemployed people leave the labor market, given how difficult it is to actively seek work and be available for work during closures.”

Hours worked in Covid-hit New South Wales fell sharply from 13% between June and August and 7% just last month.

Unsurprisingly, other jurisdictions hit by the lockdowns also saw a significant drop in hours worked in August, down 3.4% in Victoria, 5.3% in Queensland and 2.5% in ACT.

“There are always people employed who temporarily work reduced hours or no hours in any given month, but the current wave of lockdowns has seen this become more common,” Jarvis said.

“Compared to August 2019, there were 1.2 million additional employed people who worked reduced hours for economic and other reasons in August 2021, including 532,000 who did not work any hours for these reasons.”

Mr James said government assistance payments had been important in helping people cope with dislocation and keep their jobs.

Jobs and consumer confidence have held up much better than during lockdowns in the first half of 2020, he said.

“This is because the emphasis is on the new end being the vaccination path to ‘freedom’,” said Mr James.

“Job vacancies have not fallen because the focus has been on companies wanting their staff back to work and workers wanting to get back to work.

“The faster the vax rates increase, the faster a certain normalcy can return and the faster the savings rebound.

“The longer people don’t work, the harder it will be to bring the labor market and economy back to pre-Delta or even pre-Covid days.”

Outside of virus-hit Australian jurisdictions, labor markets have remained tight – a clear result of state and foreign border closures, Mr James said.

Before being briefed in detail on the employment data, Prime Minister Scott Morrison noted: “We don’t have a large number of people immigrating to Australia at the moment. Even today, on the workforce numbers that we have… it shows that we’re going to need people in construction jobs, in construction jobs, ”Mr. Morrison said.

ABS figures also released on Thursday showed that international border closures had slowed Australia’s population growth to a virtual halt during the year through March.

The country’s population grew by just over 0.1%, or 35,700 people, to 25.7 million, compared to 1.5% growth in calendar year 2019.

Population growth over the past 12 months was entirely due to 131,000 births, while net overseas migration declined by 95,300 – for the first time since 1946.

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Polaroid Now + Reviews | CNN underlined https://web-a-photo.com/polaroid-now-reviews-cnn-underlined/ Mon, 13 Sep 2021 15:32:00 +0000 https://web-a-photo.com/polaroid-now-reviews-cnn-underlined/ CNN – We all know and love Polaroid for its analog cameras and the ’90s nostalgia that goes with them, but the new Polaroid Now + takes things to a whole new level. This camera is the brand’s most high-tech option to date, and after a week of testing we can confirm that it is […]]]>



CNN

We all know and love Polaroid for its analog cameras and the ’90s nostalgia that goes with them, but the new Polaroid Now + takes things to a whole new level. This camera is the brand’s most high-tech option to date, and after a week of testing we can confirm that it is quite exceptional for an analog camera.

Associated with the Polaroid app, the Now + offers great creativity. Whether you’re a professional photographer or looking to take some fun photos with your friends, the Polaroid Now + is a fun, high-tech film camera that’s well worth the effort.

A fun and high-tech camera

The Polaroid Now + is a high-tech take on the classic instant camera, giving you plenty of fun, app-based options to customize your shots.

Who is he talking to : The Polaroid Now + is ideal for novice and advanced photographers. Whether you are just starting to play with analog and film cameras or are a seasoned pro, this is a great option for taking fun photos with friends or creating dreamy artistic images.

What would you like to know: The price of $ 149 seems high, but the control of the smartphone app is well worth it. Now + comes with almost everything you’ll need to get started. You’ll get a micro USB charging cable, a lens filter kit, and of course the camera itself. The downside is that the Now + uses Polaroid’s i-Type color film and you’ll have to buy it separately (like this 16-sheet pack for $ 29.99). Overall, the camera was easy to set up and use, and the app allowed a lot of controls on the device.

How it compares: Now + introduces two new features: aperture priority and tripod mode. It sets itself apart from the rest of the Polaroid line with smartphone-based controls, something you won’t find in comparable cameras. The Fujifilm Instax Square SQ1 costs $ 119 but lacks app control and features like double exposure or light painting. The older model, the Polaroid Now, costs $ 99.99 and while you still get creative and useful features like double exposure and autofocus, you don’t get the wide range of options that come with it. the Now +. The Now + sits at the top of the price range, but also with the most control and capacity.

Ellen McAlpine / CNN

The Now + works the same as the Polaroid camera that the kids of the 90s used (or the Instax for all Gen Zs). The camera seems a bit bulky at first, but it never felt awkward or uncomfortable. It is available in three colors, white, black and cool blue. The design is reminiscent of an old school analog camera that we loved. If you don’t want to take advantage of any of the camera’s extensive features, you can just point, shoot, and wait for your impression to develop. When your photo comes out of the film tray, there is a sheet of black plastic that will cover your image so that it doesn’t get too exposed or damaged. The film will take up to 15 minutes to develop, but then you’ll end up with a pretty stellar plan.

Your photos will never be as clear as on a digital camera, but we found that photos taken in standard and portrait mode were crisp and clear. If you’re shooting in modes like double exposure or playing around with aperture, you’ll need to do some trial and error before you end up with a shot you’re happy with. The analog camera gives you the aesthetic of film colors, which tend to be cooler and more contrasting. When taking photos at night, you will definitely need to be careful with the flash, but shooting indoors in natural light will make your images look soft and pleasant.

Ellen McAlpine / CNN

Loading the film tray was not a difficult task but there weren’t a lot of instructions to help us. It would have been nice to have a bit more advice as there were a few more steps we needed to take like making sure the top exposure sheet unwinds before we can start taking pictures. It’s easy to tell which side the film should be facing up, but it’s unclear which end of the film goes first. We ended up seeing a little arrow and after the elimination process we figured out which side came in first. The film fits snug and the film tray hinge was solid and even tinkering to make sure it was properly installed. We didn’t feel like something was too fragile or was going to break if we made a mistake.

Charging the camera did not take long (about an hour) and you can check the battery level through the app. We didn’t need to reload Now + often; one charge should last you while shooting through 15 packs of film. If you’re using the camera to have fun with friends, you probably won’t be using as many movies as possible, so you’ll need to do a handful of uses before you need to reload. Another bonus is that the Now + will turn itself off if you haven’t used it for a while. We like the battery saving feature and the ability to easily check the state of charge.

Ellen McAlpine / CNN

Now for the fun stuff! The biggest addition you get with the Now + is the associated Polaroid app (available for Androids and iPhones). Even if you are using an analog camera, you get all the benefits of digital photography technology through your phone. The interface of the application is quite intuitive; we found it to be easy to navigate and that being said, there isn’t much on it to make it complicated or overwhelming. The camera connects to the app via Bluetooth, but you don’t have to take any major steps to connect it. Just turn on the camera, open the app and it will connect automatically. We really liked the simplicity of the Bluetooth connection and the fact that we didn’t need to add the camera as a device through settings or take any extra steps.

You go through each shooting mode the camera works with and when you finally stop at a specific screen, the camera stays in that mode. The modes are manual mode, light painting mode, double exposure mode, aperture priority and tripod mode. You can also use the app as a remote control for the camera. These modes are super cool and can earn you some pretty stellar photos if you know how to use them properly. Some modes, like portrait mode, are much easier to use than others. Options like light painting may take a bit more practice to get used to. We had a little trouble figuring out how long we needed to finalize the plan.

Ellen McAlpine / CNN

If you ask someone else to take your photo using Now +, you or your photographer will need to set camera mode using the Polaroid app. You cannot change modes on the camera itself, but the camera shutter button still works. Whether you are using the app as a remote control or have someone else take a picture of you, setting up the app for shooting is pretty straightforward and its controls are easy enough to communicate with others involved in it. your photo adventures.

The only gripe we have with the app is the minimal explanation of the best setup for each photo. Some that you’ve probably heard of and can conceptualize. Portrait mode, for example, is a popular photo style with iPhone and Android users. You get instructions if the installation was too dark, light, near or far. Light paint and aperture mode, however, are more familiar terms for people with a little more photography experience. There are little bulb icons you can click to get information about the photo you can create, but that doesn’t help you set up your shot or break it down step by step. We would have liked to see a bit more of a detailed breakdown included in the app.

The lens filters that come with the Now + don’t add much to the experience, but they’re a lot of fun. They come in four different colors: blue, red, amber, yellow and there is also a prism filter. They snap onto the lens easily and can add vivid tones and highlights to your images, but weren’t a major selling point for us.

Overall, the Now + is straightforward to set up even though the instructions were minimal. We would have liked to see a little more step-by-step detail in the app, like opening mode or light painting mode, and loading the movie. Without those details, it took us a little longer than expected to figure everything out.

Ellen McAlpine / CNN

At $ 149.99, the Polaroid Now + is a great buy if you’re looking for a higher tech analog camera, although you’ll need to purchase a film separately. The Polaroid app is very intuitive and adds a lot of value to the camera itself. Having such easy control over the device and being able to access movie techniques using an app that breaks it all down makes the Now + definitely worth the price.

We would have liked to see a little more specific instructions through the app, but we have always been impressed and enjoyed using the camera. Lens filters are fun but not our favorite part of buying, or a big selling point for us. The Now + is a great gadget if you are looking to take fun photos using different photography methods.

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Part of the closed New York Taconic State Parkway in the Hudson Valley https://web-a-photo.com/part-of-the-closed-new-york-taconic-state-parkway-in-the-hudson-valley/ Sat, 11 Sep 2021 17:00:00 +0000 https://web-a-photo.com/part-of-the-closed-new-york-taconic-state-parkway-in-the-hudson-valley/ Many drivers have faced a traffic nightmare on the Taconic State Parkway in the Hudson Valley. For all the news that the Hudson Valley shares, be sure to follow Hudson Valley Post on Facebook, download the Hudson Valley Post mobile app, and sign up for the Hudson Valley Post newsletter. IDA damage forced authorities to […]]]>

Many drivers have faced a traffic nightmare on the Taconic State Parkway in the Hudson Valley.

For all the news that the Hudson Valley shares, be sure to follow Hudson Valley Post on Facebook, download the Hudson Valley Post mobile app, and sign up for the Hudson Valley Post newsletter.

IDA damage forced authorities to close section of Taconic State Parkway in Dutchess County

At around 11:15 a.m., New York State Police issued a traffic alert. Police have confirmed that all southbound lanes on the Taconic State Parkway between Exit 47 (State Route 55) and Exit 45 (Arthursburg Road) are closed near the town of LaGrange.

The closure was for emergency repair due to flood damage, officials said. The closure is scheduled for 24 hours, with the Taconic State Parkway scheduled to reopen after the Friday morning rush hour.

Traffic is diverted from the Taconic State Parkway at Route 55 in the town of LaGrange.

Update: Around 7 a.m. on Friday, New York State Police announced repairs were completed early and the lanes reopened.

Hudson Valley Restaurants with Most Critical Violations in 2021

Critical infractions are those that can cause immediate harm to consumers, such as undercooked food and improper storage of ingredients. Other violations such as inadequate hand washing facilities or dirty conditions are noted as non-critical violations.

The ten restaurants below all received four or more critical violations during their last inspection in 2021. In some cases, inspectors have given restaurants an opportunity to correct the violations and have done so. Just because a restaurant is on this list does not mean that it is currently breaking the health code. However, the Board of Health thinks it’s important to be armed with information about how seriously a restaurant takes kitchen cleanliness, food safety, and other important rules that affect the food you give to. your family.

Air-breathing fish that eat animals found in the Hudson Valley, New York

An invasive Asian fish that can live on land for days and uses its sharp teeth to eat animals has been spotted in the Hudson Valley and other parts of New York state.

Look inside: Aston Martin designs the first Hudson Valley home

Luxury automaker Aston Martin has designed a crazy house in the Hudson Valley that is now on the market. The house is considered one of the “most exciting and sophisticated to be built in the Hudson Valley”.

Shocking photos show Ida’s devastation in New York’s Hudson Valley

Images of the Hudson Valley, mostly underwater, after Tropical Depression Ida

Peek Inside has banned NFL owner’s $ 60 million yacht docked in Hudson Valley

Take a look at an incredible $ 60 million yacht owned by an NFL owner that’s been docked for weeks in the Hudson Valley.

Hudson Valley says goodbye to over 70 businesses

Award-winning actor selling Hudson Valley “Mountaintop Masterpiece”

Award-winning actor sells “mountain masterpiece” in Napanoch, County Ulster. Check out all the photos of this impressive “mountain masterpiece” below:

Did you know? Over 100 fun facts about the Hudson Valley

Did you know that Lucille Ball made her debut on stage in the Hudson Valley? How about Philadelphia Cream Cheese was invented not in Philadelphia, but in Orange County? Or that a Dutchess County mansion inspired the phrase “follow the Joneses?” »Find out and over 100 other fun facts about the Hudson Valley.

Take a look at the most expensive house on the market in the Hudson Valley

The most expensive home for sale in all of New York State is in the Hudson Valley.

WATCH: Here are the 25 Best Places to Live in New York State

Stacker has compiled a list of the best places to live in New York using data from Niche. Niche ranks places to live based on a variety of factors including cost of living, schools, healthcare, recreation, and weather. Cities, suburbs and villages have been included. Ads and images are from realtor.com.

On the list, there is a solid mix of offerings ranging from large schools and nightlife to public and pedestrian parks. Some regions have experienced rapid growth thanks to the establishment of new businesses in the region, while others offer a glimpse into the history of the region with well-preserved architecture and museums. Read on to see if your hometown makes the list.

Nearly 30 high-risk New York sex offenders recently moved to the Hudson Valley

New York officials are alerting the public to 30 New York sex offenders who recently moved to the Hudson Valley.

Photos: historic “Hudson Mansion”, with scene listed at a reduced price

Hidden treasure worth thousands of dollars found in New York home

38 “most wanted” in New York

New York State authorities, including the FBI, have identified these people as his “most wanted fugitives.” Officials are asking for help in locating them, but warn they should be considered “armed and dangerous”.

Top rated Airbnb in New York found in the Hudson Valley

You won’t have to leave the Hudson Valley if you want to enjoy New York’s top rated Airbnb.

40 children disappeared from the Hudson Valley

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High natural gas prices weigh on Europeans and weigh on recovery https://web-a-photo.com/high-natural-gas-prices-weigh-on-europeans-and-weigh-on-recovery/ Thu, 09 Sep 2021 02:55:16 +0000 https://web-a-photo.com/high-natural-gas-prices-weigh-on-europeans-and-weigh-on-recovery/ LONDON – As the world struggles to recover from the pandemic, soaring natural gas prices threaten to become a drag on economies in Europe and beyond. Wholesale fuel prices are at their highest level in years – nearly five times what they were then in 2019, before people started to get sick from the virus. […]]]>

LONDON – As the world struggles to recover from the pandemic, soaring natural gas prices threaten to become a drag on economies in Europe and beyond. Wholesale fuel prices are at their highest level in years – nearly five times what they were then in 2019, before people started to get sick from the virus.

High costs are fueling electricity prices and have started showing up in utility bills, weighing on consumers whose personal finances have already been strained by the pandemic. Price hikes are unusual as demand is generally relatively weak during the warmer summer months, raising alarm bells about the prospect of further increases when demand increases in the winter.

Spanish households are paying around 40% more than they paid for electricity a year ago, as the wholesale price has more than doubled, prompting angry protests against utility companies.

“The rise in electricity prices has created a lot of outrage, and of course this is moving into the streets,” said María Campuzano, spokesperson for the Alliance Against Energy Poverty, a Spanish association that helps people people who are struggling to pay their energy bills.

The pain is felt across Europe, where gas is used for home heating and cooking as well as for the production of electricity. Citing record prices for natural gas, the UK energy regulatory agency Ofgem recently gave the green light for utilities to raise the ceiling on energy bills for millions of households paying standard tariffs by around 12%, to 1,277 pounds, or $ 1,763, per year.

Several trends are behind the surge in prices, including a resurgence in global demand after pandemic lockdowns, led by China, and a European cold snap at the end of this year’s winter that drained markets. storage levels. The higher than expected demand and the reduced supply are “a perfect storm,” said Marco Alverà, managing director of Snam, Milan’s big gas company.

The concern is that if Europe experiences a cold winter, prices could rise further, possibly forcing some factories to close temporarily.

“If it’s cold, then we’re in trouble,” Alverà said.

The jump has prompted some to call for an acceleration of the shift from fossil fuels to clean household energy sources like wind and solar power to free consumers from being at the mercy of global commodity markets.

“The reality is that we need to switch to renewables faster,” said Greg Jackson, managing director of Octopus Energy, a UK utility.

On the flip side, price turmoil can also be a harbinger of volatility if energy companies start to move away from fossil fuel production before renewables are ready to take over, analysts say. In addition, the closure of coal-fired power plants in Britain and other countries has reduced the flexibility of the system, Mr Alverà said.

Gas prices in the United States have also increased, but they are only about a quarter of those paid in Europe. The United States has a great price advantage over Europe due to its large domestic supply of relatively cheap gas from shale drilling and other activities, while Europe has to import most of its gas.

The immediate concern for European markets is that suppliers did not follow their usual practice and used the summer months to fill the storage chambers with cheap gas which will be used during the winter, when the cold more than doubles gas consumption in countries like Great Britain. and Germany.

Instead, suppliers responded to the cold at the end of last winter by emptying gas storage facilities. Subsequently, they were reluctant to refill them with high-priced gas. As a result, European storage facilities are at the usual depleted levels in winter rather than peaks in autumn.

“The market is very nervous as the winter season approaches,” said Laura Page, analyst at Kpler, a research firm. “We have very low storage levels for the time of year. “

Europe imports around 60 percent of its gas, with supplies coming from Russia and, to a lesser extent, Algeria and Libya.

Liquefied natural gas, arriving by ship from the United States, Qatar and elsewhere, generally helps to balance the market. This year, however, LNG carriers have been lured by higher prices in China, South Korea and Brazil, where a drought has caused a drop in the power generated by the dams.

As a result, Italy, Spain and northwestern Europe have seen steep declines in liquefied natural gas infusions, according to data from Wood Mackenzie, a market research firm.

In addition to the tense situation in Europe, Groningen, the giant gas field in the Netherlands that has long served as a safety valve for both its home country and West Germany, is gradually being closed. due to earthquakes. Over the past year, European gas prices have fallen from around $ 4 per million British thermal units to around $ 18.

Russia, Europe’s largest gas supplier, and Algeria have significantly increased their exports, but not enough to allay market concerns. Some analysts wonder whether Gazprom, the Russian gas company, is pursuing a high price strategy or trying to persuade the West to allow the completion of its Nord Stream 2 gas pipeline project, which will bring gas from Russia to the United States. Germany.

“At first glance, it seems like some sort of game is playing out here,” said Graham Freedman, analyst at Wood Mackenzie. On the other hand, Freedman said, Gazprom might not have any more gas to export.

A Gazprom spokeswoman said: “Our mission is to fulfill contractual obligations to our customers, not to ‘reduce the concerns’ of an abstract market.” She added that Gazprom had increased its supplies to near record levels this year.

Construction of the 746-mile pipeline, which runs under the Baltic Sea, was halted last year just before its completion off the German coast by threat of US sanctions. But in a deal with Germany in July, the Biden administration agreed to drop its threat to shut down the pipeline. On Monday, the project’s management company said it aims to operate the pipeline this year.

Stanley Reed reported from London and Raphael Minder from Madrid.

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Apple revisits plans for new child safety tools after privacy backlash https://web-a-photo.com/apple-revisits-plans-for-new-child-safety-tools-after-privacy-backlash/ Sat, 04 Sep 2021 15:06:00 +0000 https://web-a-photo.com/apple-revisits-plans-for-new-child-safety-tools-after-privacy-backlash/ On Friday, the company said it would pause testing of the tool in order to gather more feedback and make improvements. The plan focuses on a new system that, if finally launched, will check iOS devices and iCloud photos for images of child abuse. It includes a new activation feature that would notify minors and […]]]>

On Friday, the company said it would pause testing of the tool in order to gather more feedback and make improvements.

The plan focuses on a new system that, if finally launched, will check iOS devices and iCloud photos for images of child abuse. It includes a new activation feature that would notify minors and their parents about sexually explicit incoming or sent image attachments in iMessage and scramble them.

Apple’s announcement last month that it would begin testing the tool matches a recent increased focus on child protection among tech companies – but it was light on specific details and was quickly greeted with tweets. indignant, critical headlines and calls for more information.
So Friday, Apple (AAPL) said it will hamper the implementation of the features.

“Last month we announced plans for features to help protect children from predators who use communication tools to recruit and exploit them, and to limit the spread of child sexual abuse material. “the company said. “Based on feedback from customers, advocacy groups, researchers and others, we have decided to take more time over the next few months to gather feedback and make improvements before releasing these features of child safety of critical importance. “

In a series of press calls to explain the tool planned last month, Apple stressed that consumer privacy would be protected because the tool would turn photos on iPhone and iPad into unreadable hashes, or complex numbers. , stored on users’ devices. Those numbers would be compared to a hash database provided by the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children (NCMEC) once the images are uploaded to Apple’s iCloud storage service. (Apple later said other organizations would be involved in addition to NCMEC.)

Only after a number of hashes would match the NCMEC photos, would the Apple review team be alerted so they could decrypt the information, deactivate the user’s account, and alert. NCMEC, which could alert law enforcement to the existence of potentially abusive images.

Many child safety and security experts have praised the intent of the plan, recognizing a company’s ethical responsibilities and obligations regarding the products and services it creates. But they also said the efforts presented potential privacy concerns.

“When people hear that Apple is ‘searching’ for child sexual abuse material (CSAM) on end-user phones, they immediately think of Big Brother and ‘1984’”, Ryan O’Leary, head of privacy research and legal technology at market research firm IDC, told CNN Business last month. “This is a very nuanced problem and one which at first glance can seem quite frightening or intrusive.”

Critics of the plan have applauded Apple’s decision to put the test on hold.

Digital rights group Fight for the Future called the tool a threat to “privacy, security, democracy and freedom” and called on Apple to put it on a permanent stop.

“Apple’s project to analyze photos and messages on the device is one of the most dangerous proposals of any tech company in modern history,” said Fight for the Future director Evan Greer. , in a press release. “Technologically, this is equivalent to installing malware on millions of devices, malware that can easily be abused and cause enormous damage.

Correction: A previous version of this story incorrectly stated the name of the digital rights group Fight for the Future.

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An auctioneer turned reseller entrusts a large collection of photos of the company’s school to Sotheby’s https://web-a-photo.com/an-auctioneer-turned-reseller-entrusts-a-large-collection-of-photos-of-the-companys-school-to-sothebys/ Wed, 01 Sep 2021 23:04:29 +0000 https://web-a-photo.com/an-auctioneer-turned-reseller-entrusts-a-large-collection-of-photos-of-the-companys-school-to-sothebys/ One of the works in the Rochell Collection which was originally part of the Impey Album, this image of a large Indian bat (or “flying fox”) is signed by Bhawani Das and dates to c. 1778-82. It is estimated between £ 300,000 and £ 500,000 at the Sotheby’s sale. Rochell is well known to Sotheby’s. […]]]>

One of the works in the Rochell Collection which was originally part of the Impey Album, this image of a large Indian bat (or “flying fox”) is signed by Bhawani Das and dates to c. 1778-82. It is estimated between £ 300,000 and £ 500,000 at the Sotheby’s sale.

Rochell is well known to Sotheby’s. He spent the first 18 years of his career at the auction house where he founded the Indian and Southeast Asian Art Department in 1988. He was then Managing Director of Sotheby’s Asia and joined the Board. directors of the company before leaving and opening his own gallery in New York in 2002.

The sale is titled ‘Into an Indian Garden’ and will feature 44 paintings across 29 lots with an overall estimate of £ 1.7-2.5million.

About half of the Company School images (works by Indian masters commissioned by East India Company officials in the 18th and 19th centuries) depict birds with others focusing on other animals, flora , human figures and architecture of the Indian subcontinent.

Most have never been exhibited to the public and are emerging for the first time in decades, but seven of the works featured in the 2019-2020 Wallace Collection exhibition Forgotten Masters: Indian Painting for the East India Company, organized by the famous writer and historian William Dalrymple.

The exhibition highlighted how these naturalistic studies on paper linked Indian artistic traditions to European working methods and the exhibition also introduced the British public to some of the best Indian painters working in the late Mughal period such as Shaykh Zayn al- Din, Ram Das, Bhawani Das and Ghulam Ali Khan – all of whom are pictured in the auction.

This sub-sector of the art market has received particular attention lately. Prices have increased dramatically over the past few decades, but more recently the advent of internet research and online auctions has made them more accessible to Indian buyers. Copies auctioned over 20 years ago can now fetch money with an extra “0” added – a noticeable increase especially in a traditional industry like this.

Sotheby’s Sales Manager Benedict Carter explained how the “remarkable hybrid style fusing Mughal and European elements” “was finally getting the attention it deserves,” while Dalrymple said it was ” of a kind that is only now starting to receive its full credit. ” .

The most valuable works in the Rochell collection come from albums commissioned by the Chief Justice of the East India Company, Sir Elijah Impey, and his wife Mary. The couple kept a menagerie of animals in their gardens in Calcutta and hired local artists to paint a total of 326 studies to record the different species between 1777 and 1783 – more than half of which depicted birds.

After the couple brought their extensive collection back to England, the albums were shattered when they were auctioned off in London in 1810. Several studies are now held in international institutions, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York and the London V&A. Today, the works on the Impey album have significant commercial cachet and dominate the market for company school paintings.

A minor adjutant stork (Leptoptilos Javanicus)

‘A Lesser Adjudant Stork (Leptoptilos Javanicus) In a Landscape’, Company School, Lucknow, c.1775-85 – estimated between £ 60,000 and £ 80,000 at Sotheby’s.

Other works in the sale were commissioned by the Fraser brothers, Viscount Valentia and Major General Claude Martin. The latter was a merchant, soldier, architect, acrobat and collector who did much to spark the fashion among British expatriates to commission and collect such works. Here, a depiction of a minor adjutant stork (Leptoptilos Javanicus) from his collection is estimated to be between £ 60,000 and £ 80,000.

Other former owners of works in the Rochell collection include Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, South Asian painting collector Edwin Binney, scholar and curator Stuart Cary Welch and former United States Ambassador to Morocco, the Hon. . Joseph Verner Reed, Jr.

Stork eating a snail

This work from the Rochell collection originates from Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis. Representing a stork eating a snail, it is among the studies, it comes from the Impey album and is signed by the artist Shaykh Zayn Al-Din and dated 1781. It is estimated between £ 200,000 and £ 300,000.

Rochell said: “I started collecting these lesser-known masterpieces over two decades ago just for my personal enjoyment, my imagination having been captured by their ‘East meets West’ aesthetic. When painted, these works were the primary means by which India could be revealed to those in Britain, who otherwise could only hear tales of this sumptuous land.

“Many years later, as they begin to take their rightful place in world art, these pieces can now inspire a new generation of collectors who I hope will cherish them as I did. . “

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